Waltzing Through Life
lapitiedangereuse:

Blonde Venus, 1932

lapitiedangereuse:

Blonde Venus, 1932

batched:

struckby21:

nihil-sub-sole-novum:

this is what a good hitler joke looks like

i feel like such a geek understanding this joke

sit down kid literally everyone gets it

batched:

struckby21:

nihil-sub-sole-novum:

this is what a good hitler joke looks like

i feel like such a geek understanding this joke

sit down kid literally everyone gets it

hood-house-wife:

stop

thewanderlustlibrarian:

elysedc:

The ultimate dad joke compilation

Reblog for “Robeneros”

That’s what I love about music. Even the most banal scenes are suddenly invested with so much meaning, you know? All these banalities, they suddenly turn into these beautiful effervescent pearls.

okcdouchebags:

xsugar-venom:

Well, you asked.

OH GOD

okcdouchebags:

xsugar-venom:

Well, you asked.

OH GOD

miwi1010:

maudelynn:


From the film, “Rescued from an Eagle’s Nest,” 1908


via Dangerous Minds


Rescued from an Eagle’s Nest (USA,1908) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0000749/

miwi1010:

maudelynn:

From the film, “Rescued from an Eagle’s Nest,” 1908

Rescued from an Eagle’s Nest (USA,1908) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0000749/

riotsofmylife:

WNT vs. Haiti: Highlights - Oct. 20, 2014

rainfelt:

stfueverything:

libertarianloki:

Thus, the logic of the feminist argument to “Teach men not to rape” is revealed.

Yes because it’s such a radical notion to expect rapists to control themselves.

Uh, we do tell thieves not to rob, though. We actually spend a lot of energy teaching kids that stealing is wrong. We keep trying to teach them it’s wrong through their teens and adult years.
And when someone gets robbed? Cops don’t ask them if their front door was locked. They don’t ask them if they invited the thief into their house and maybe said the thief was free to take things before changing their mind the next day. And this is true even though sometimes people do get robbed by folks they invite in under false pretenses.
Cops and lawyers and judges don’t work together to make people who get robbed feel like shit for not installing extra security systems or putting bars on their windows. They don’t use people’s former history of inviting neighbors in and letting them borrow stuff to argue that they had no right to expect someone to respect their property. The media doesn’t talk about how the thief’s promising life was ruined by their victim’s decision to prosecute.
Your metaphor is bad and you should feel bad.

rainfelt:

stfueverything:

libertarianloki:

Thus, the logic of the feminist argument to “Teach men not to rape” is revealed.

Yes because it’s such a radical notion to expect rapists to control themselves.

Uh, we do tell thieves not to rob, though. We actually spend a lot of energy teaching kids that stealing is wrong. We keep trying to teach them it’s wrong through their teens and adult years.

And when someone gets robbed? Cops don’t ask them if their front door was locked. They don’t ask them if they invited the thief into their house and maybe said the thief was free to take things before changing their mind the next day. And this is true even though sometimes people do get robbed by folks they invite in under false pretenses.

Cops and lawyers and judges don’t work together to make people who get robbed feel like shit for not installing extra security systems or putting bars on their windows. They don’t use people’s former history of inviting neighbors in and letting them borrow stuff to argue that they had no right to expect someone to respect their property. The media doesn’t talk about how the thief’s promising life was ruined by their victim’s decision to prosecute.

Your metaphor is bad and you should feel bad.

salesonfilm:

The History Of Black Cinema In Vintage Hollywood Posters

Since 1973, cinephile John Duke Kisch has been documenting the evolution of African American film through a beloved, but sometimes overlooked medium — movie posters. From “Siren of the Tropics,” starring the inimitable Josephine Baker, to “Cotton Comes to Harlem,” an Ossie Davis favorite, Kisch meticulously found and saved the stunning visual advertisements for films that adorned city streets and theater halls. Eventually, he amassed over 38,000 posters from 30 different countries, amounting to a massive visual history of Hollywood’s relationship to race and representation.

His collection, the world’s largest privately owned archive of black film memorabilia, has recently been compiled into a book, titled A Separate Cinema: The First 100 Years of Black Poster Art. A striking homage to the graphic design aesthetic of yesteryear, the series of pop artworks more importantly outlines the way the film industry has portrayed black actors and characters for over a century.

Visit Kisch’s website A Separate Cinema